Centerport United Methodist Church
            The Pastors' messages comes from the Summer issue of our monthly church newsletter - The Focus.

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME


John Deckard lived in a little village set amid the English countryside. He worked as a clerk in a textile factory. A modest and quiet man, he lived in an ordinary little house at the edge of town with his wife and his six-year- old son, Rob.


Like thousands of Englishmen, every morning John put on his plain tweed suit, got on his bicycle, and rode to work. Returning home at five in the evening, he would work in his garden until suppertime. Then he would spend a quiet evening with his pipe and family. He was a very ordinary man living what most people would call a very ordinary life.

But John Deckard had one claim to fame. For five consecutive years he had won the blue ribbon in the Village Garden Show with his prize rose. It had gone on so long that people had come to expect it. John Deckard’s prize rose would win, and that was that.


Behind his house was his rose garden. When he returned home each evening, he would don his coveralls and spend his time out there with his roses. Some said he had more than just “a way with flowers.” Some said he mothered them, that he talked to them and that they understood what he said.


This year, deep in his heart, John Deckard knew that he would again win the blue ribbon. This year his rose was truly a rose among roses. Never had he seen such perfection in a flower. This was his masterpiece and as he watched it daily, his contentment and pride grew.


The show was on Saturday and he planned to transplant his rose to a pot early in the morning. But while he was at breakfast, a tragedy happened. His little son Rob burst into the kitchen and chatting excitedly he rushed to the table, exclaiming, “Look Daddy, look what I have for you!”


And in his son’s grimy little hand, half its petals gone, its head drooping, was John Deckard’s prize rose. Rob was so proud of the present he had picked for his father.


That afternoon, visitors to the Garden Show were astonished when they came to John Deckard’s entry. There, in a flower pot, he had thrust a stick, and attached to it, at the very top, was a picture of his little son, Rob.


When the judges heard what had happened, they gave John Deckard an honorary blue ribbon. Some said that the rose that was not a rose was the finest he had ever grown.


When is a rose not a rose? When it is replaced by something even more beautiful, love. The love we share with little and big children of God, the love God first gave us in his own son who was willing to go to such great lengths to sacrifice his precious life for us.


This summer, after all we have been through, try taking more time to appreciate the little roses in your life. Think about everything that makes them the precious, irreplaceable creations that they are. Even when things don’t go according to plan, prizing love above all else will make your life the rosiest it can be.



Pastor Roy


 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SOCIAL JUSTICE - SO, WHAT CAN I DO?

 

 

Continue the dialogue. For now, one thing you can do is share your thoughts and feelings about what is happening. Talk to your family, your neighbors, fellow church members, and friends about what is going on in our society. What does Scripture say? What is our call?

 

 

You ca Learn more. A few resources are listed here: http://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/ERASE_Racism-long-island-district-facts.pdf.

 

 

https://msw.usc.edu/mswusc-blog/diversity-workshop-guide-to-discussing-identity-power-and-privilege/.

 

 

McIntosh, Peggy. “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” Independent School 49, no. 2 (1990): 31-35. https://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/mcintosh.pdf

 

 

3 ½ Minutes 10 Bullets, Marc Silver, dir. (2015). http://www.takepart.com/three-and-a-half -minutes-ten-bullets.

 

 

http://www.indigenouspeople.net/blackwht.htm.

 

 

Glaude Jr., Eddie J. Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul. New York: Crown Publishing Group, 2016.

 

 

O’Neil, Cathy, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy. New York: Crown Publishers, 2016.

 

 

Wilson-Hartgrove, Jonathon. Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion. Westmont, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2018.

 

 

Join our efforts to eradicate racism. Our church is working to join groups and find more resources in our community to continue the efforts to listen, learn, connect, and take action. Stay tuned for more information to come.

 


Continue the dialogue. For now, one thing you can do is share your thoughts and feelings about what is
happening. Talk to your family, your neighbors, fellow church members, and friends about what is going on in
our society. What does Scripture say? What is our call?
You can learn more. A few resources are listed here:
http://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/ERASE_Racism-long-island-district-facts.pdf.
https://msw.usc.edu/mswusc-blog/diversity-workshop-guide-to-discussing-identity-power-and-
privilege/.
McIntosh, Peggy. “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” Independent
School 49, no. 2 (1990): 31-35.
https://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/mcintosh.pdf
3 1⁄2 Minutes 10 Bullets, Marc Silver, dir. (2015). http://www.takepart.com/three-and-a-half-minutes-
ten-bullets.
http://www.indigenouspeople.net/blackwht.htm.
Glaude Jr., Eddie J. Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul. New York: Crown
Publishing Group, 2016.
O’Neil, Cathy, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality
and Threatens Democracy. New York: Crown Publishers, 2016.
Wilson-Hartgrove, Jonathon. Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion.
Westmont, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2018.
Join our efforts to eradicate racism. Our church is working to join groups and find more resources in our
SO, WHAT CAN I DO?
Continue the dialogue. For now, one thing you can do is share your thoughts and feelings about what is
happening. Talk to your family, your neighbors, fellow church members, and friends about what is going on in
our society. What does Scripture say? What is our call?
You can learn more. A few resources are listed here:
http://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/ERASE_Racism-long-island-district-facts.pdf.
https://msw.usc.edu/mswusc-blog/diversity-workshop-guide-to-discussing-identity-power-and-
privilege/.
McIntosh, Peggy. “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” Independent
School 49, no. 2 (1990): 31-35.
https://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/mcintosh.pdf
3 1⁄2 Minutes 10 Bullets, Marc Silver, dir. (2015). http://www.takepart.com/three-and-a-half-minutes-
ten-bullets.
http://www.indigenouspeople.net/blackwht.htm.
Glaude Jr., Eddie J. Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul. New York: Crown
Publishing Group, 2016.
O’Neil, Cathy, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality
and Threatens Democracy. New York: Crown Publishers, 2016.
Wilson-Hartgrove, Jonathon. Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion.
Westmont, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2018.
Join our efforts to eradicate racism. Our church is working to join groups and find more resources in our
community to continue the efforts to listen, learn, connect, and take action. Stay tuned for more information
to come